You look at the projector. Your throat is tight and your palms are sweaty. An hour later, the meeting went well. You delivered your presentation and answered all subsequent questions. Read on to learn how.

 1 
...feel free to share our articles :)

 

Focusing on the audience

If you want your audience to not only listen but also accept the message and act on it, our advice is that you focus on them. Of course, it should not distract from the presentation’s actual message, but the content must be adapted to the recipients, and you must capture and keep their attention. But how do you do it? We’ve found inspiration in journalism. Many people know about the inverted pyramid: the classic disposition model of news articles, stipulating that you should open with the most important information, the news, and then move deeper into the subject. Think of a classic newspaper article. 

However, few know of another approach that journalists also use, especially in the evening TV news. The model is from the US and is simply called “HEY-YOU-SEE-SO”. This model is good to use when structuring presentations, because it emphasizes grabbing your audience’s attention before you go on to explain what you have in mind.  

 

Hey!

Look here! First, you need an eye-opener. It may even surprise your audience, but it must relate to the rest of your presentation. In Antiquity it was known that the opening should be attractive and captivating. If the opening does not grab the audience, we know that their attention will quickly move on to other things. Eyes wander, phones are checked, concentration dissipates, and the whole point of the presentation (to change attitudes, call to action, inform about new developments, invest in new products) is lost. 

 

You!

“What I am about to say is relevant to you because…” You have to turn the focus on your audience immediately. Take Martin Luther King’s opening words from his famous ‘I have a dream’ speech: “I am happy to join with you today in what will go down in history as the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of our nation.” After that opening, no one can doubt that King had great ambitions for himself and his audience. Note also how King really hits his HEY and YOU together and praises his listeners.     

But not all of us are gifted with Martin Luther King’s charisma, and you can’t be sure your colleagues will freely spend a part of their working day listening to you. Therefore, you have to address the question of why their presence is vital within the first few minutes. If you can’t give a good reason, you should consider whether to even call for a meeting. A good reason will grab their attention. Then you can unfold the substance of your presentation.

 

See!

“Now let me tell you what this is all about…” Here you explain the background to your presentation, such as why the strategy has become what it is, argue for the choices taken and continuously support it with figures and examples you know will make an impression.  No presentation can stand alone with only a catchy introduction. The substance must be in place and you should fine-tune your arguments. Is it primarily about finances? About good working conditions? About health? Or something else? Focus therefore on a single subject. Otherwise you will end up spraying bullets to no effect. 

If you know your audience can raise counterarguments faster than you can open the cliché bag and say, “It’s a win-win situation”, you must have a good answer ready and incorporated into your presentation. We call it rhetorical immunization. In this way it becomes harder for critics to claim that you have not considered the negatives. It is also far more convincing because you have shown that you left no stone unturned in your quest for a sound solution. 

 

So!

“From a broader perspective, it is relevant to you, but also to the rest of the company…”  Now you can draw the big lines and provide a view of the greater vision together before you round up and repeat your main message. Finally, tell your listeners what the next concrete step, which involves them directly, will be. Particularly in spoken presentations it is very important not to be afraid of repetition. Even if you have made a big deal out of adapting the message to your recipients, we don’t remember things very well, especially when it is time for lunch, today’s to-do list beckons, or the weekend plans with the family are being considered. 

 

New Behaviour

An hour later, the meeting went well. You delivered your presentation and answered all subsequent questions. Your colleagues were responsive and you received approving looks and nodding heads at the right time. Most of all, you managed to praise their efforts, explain the common challenges that lie ahead, and finally, tell them when and why they should be on the ball. Success comes with a powerful message and a clear structure built on the “Hey-You-See-So” principle. The benefit is that your audience can see they represent an important part of the new strategy. In this way they become inclined to change behaviour in order to reach their own goals and those of the company.    

 

By Marcus Lantz 

 

 1 
 

 

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 1 
...feel free to share our articles :)

 

Focusing on the audience

If you want your audience to not only listen but also accept the message and act on it, our advice is that you focus on them. Of course, it should not distract from the presentation’s actual message, but the content must be adapted to the recipients, and you must capture and keep their attention. But how do you do it? We’ve found inspiration in journalism. Many people know about the inverted pyramid: the classic disposition model of news articles, stipulating that you should open with the most important information, the news, and then move deeper into the subject. Think of a classic newspaper article. 

However, few know of another approach that journalists also use, especially in the evening TV news. The model is from the US and is simply called “HEY-YOU-SEE-SO”. This model is good to use when structuring presentations, because it emphasizes grabbing your audience’s attention before you go on to explain what you have in mind.  

 

Hey!

Look here! First, you need an eye-opener. It may even surprise your audience, but it must relate to the rest of your presentation. In Antiquity it was known that the opening should be attractive and captivating. If the opening does not grab the audience, we know that their attention will quickly move on to other things. Eyes wander, phones are checked, concentration dissipates, and the whole point of the presentation (to change attitudes, call to action, inform about new developments, invest in new products) is lost. 

 

You!

“What I am about to say is relevant to you because…” You have to turn the focus on your audience immediately. Take Martin Luther King’s opening words from his famous ‘I have a dream’ speech: “I am happy to join with you today in what will go down in history as the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of our nation.” After that opening, no one can doubt that King had great ambitions for himself and his audience. Note also how King really hits his HEY and YOU together and praises his listeners.     

But not all of us are gifted with Martin Luther King’s charisma, and you can’t be sure your colleagues will freely spend a part of their working day listening to you. Therefore, you have to address the question of why their presence is vital within the first few minutes. If you can’t give a good reason, you should consider whether to even call for a meeting. A good reason will grab their attention. Then you can unfold the substance of your presentation.

 

See!

“Now let me tell you what this is all about…” Here you explain the background to your presentation, such as why the strategy has become what it is, argue for the choices taken and continuously support it with figures and examples you know will make an impression.  No presentation can stand alone with only a catchy introduction. The substance must be in place and you should fine-tune your arguments. Is it primarily about finances? About good working conditions? About health? Or something else? Focus therefore on a single subject. Otherwise you will end up spraying bullets to no effect. 

If you know your audience can raise counterarguments faster than you can open the cliché bag and say, “It’s a win-win situation”, you must have a good answer ready and incorporated into your presentation. We call it rhetorical immunization. In this way it becomes harder for critics to claim that you have not considered the negatives. It is also far more convincing because you have shown that you left no stone unturned in your quest for a sound solution. 

 

So!

“From a broader perspective, it is relevant to you, but also to the rest of the company…”  Now you can draw the big lines and provide a view of the greater vision together before you round up and repeat your main message. Finally, tell your listeners what the next concrete step, which involves them directly, will be. Particularly in spoken presentations it is very important not to be afraid of repetition. Even if you have made a big deal out of adapting the message to your recipients, we don’t remember things very well, especially when it is time for lunch, today’s to-do list beckons, or the weekend plans with the family are being considered. 

 

New Behaviour

An hour later, the meeting went well. You delivered your presentation and answered all subsequent questions. Your colleagues were responsive and you received approving looks and nodding heads at the right time. Most of all, you managed to praise their efforts, explain the common challenges that lie ahead, and finally, tell them when and why they should be on the ball. Success comes with a powerful message and a clear structure built on the “Hey-You-See-So” principle. The benefit is that your audience can see they represent an important part of the new strategy. In this way they become inclined to change behaviour in order to reach their own goals and those of the company.    

 

By Marcus Lantz 

 

 1 
 

 

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 1 
...feel free to share our articles :)

 

Focusing on the audience

If you want your audience to not only listen but also accept the message and act on it, our advice is that you focus on them. Of course, it should not distract from the presentation’s actual message, but the content must be adapted to the recipients, and you must capture and keep their attention. But how do you do it? We’ve found inspiration in journalism. Many people know about the inverted pyramid: the classic disposition model of news articles, stipulating that you should open with the most important information, the news, and then move deeper into the subject. Think of a classic newspaper article. 

However, few know of another approach that journalists also use, especially in the evening TV news. The model is from the US and is simply called “HEY-YOU-SEE-SO”. This model is good to use when structuring presentations, because it emphasizes grabbing your audience’s attention before you go on to explain what you have in mind.  

 

Hey!

Look here! First, you need an eye-opener. It may even surprise your audience, but it must relate to the rest of your presentation. In Antiquity it was known that the opening should be attractive and captivating. If the opening does not grab the audience, we know that their attention will quickly move on to other things. Eyes wander, phones are checked, concentration dissipates, and the whole point of the presentation (to change attitudes, call to action, inform about new developments, invest in new products) is lost. 

 

You!

“What I am about to say is relevant to you because…” You have to turn the focus on your audience immediately. Take Martin Luther King’s opening words from his famous ‘I have a dream’ speech: “I am happy to join with you today in what will go down in history as the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of our nation.” After that opening, no one can doubt that King had great ambitions for himself and his audience. Note also how King really hits his HEY and YOU together and praises his listeners.     

But not all of us are gifted with Martin Luther King’s charisma, and you can’t be sure your colleagues will freely spend a part of their working day listening to you. Therefore, you have to address the question of why their presence is vital within the first few minutes. If you can’t give a good reason, you should consider whether to even call for a meeting. A good reason will grab their attention. Then you can unfold the substance of your presentation.

 

See!

“Now let me tell you what this is all about…” Here you explain the background to your presentation, such as why the strategy has become what it is, argue for the choices taken and continuously support it with figures and examples you know will make an impression.  No presentation can stand alone with only a catchy introduction. The substance must be in place and you should fine-tune your arguments. Is it primarily about finances? About good working conditions? About health? Or something else? Focus therefore on a single subject. Otherwise you will end up spraying bullets to no effect. 

If you know your audience can raise counterarguments faster than you can open the cliché bag and say, “It’s a win-win situation”, you must have a good answer ready and incorporated into your presentation. We call it rhetorical immunization. In this way it becomes harder for critics to claim that you have not considered the negatives. It is also far more convincing because you have shown that you left no stone unturned in your quest for a sound solution. 

 

So!

“From a broader perspective, it is relevant to you, but also to the rest of the company…”  Now you can draw the big lines and provide a view of the greater vision together before you round up and repeat your main message. Finally, tell your listeners what the next concrete step, which involves them directly, will be. Particularly in spoken presentations it is very important not to be afraid of repetition. Even if you have made a big deal out of adapting the message to your recipients, we don’t remember things very well, especially when it is time for lunch, today’s to-do list beckons, or the weekend plans with the family are being considered. 

 

New Behaviour

An hour later, the meeting went well. You delivered your presentation and answered all subsequent questions. Your colleagues were responsive and you received approving looks and nodding heads at the right time. Most of all, you managed to praise their efforts, explain the common challenges that lie ahead, and finally, tell them when and why they should be on the ball. Success comes with a powerful message and a clear structure built on the “Hey-You-See-So” principle. The benefit is that your audience can see they represent an important part of the new strategy. In this way they become inclined to change behaviour in order to reach their own goals and those of the company.    

 

By Marcus Lantz 

 

 1 
 

 

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